Warfield

July 26, 2018 - Comment

Check out these home security images: Warfield Image by BC Gov Photos These young girls avidly pursue a game of croquet on the front lawn of a lovingly restored "Mickey Mouse" home in Upper Warfield. Young families enjoy the security that the village offers; acting on the belief that it takes a village to raise

Check out these home security images:

Warfield

Image by BC Gov Photos
These young girls avidly pursue a game of croquet on the front lawn of a lovingly restored "Mickey Mouse" home in Upper Warfield. Young families enjoy the security that the village offers; acting on the belief that it takes a village to raise a child. Everyone is within close walking distance to Webster Elementary School.

American Indian Heritage Month — Journeys to the Past
home security
Image by U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District
Living history group educates and enlightens
By Dave Palmer

LOS ANGELES — To honor the contributions of American Indians and Alaska Natives the Los Angeles District headquarters was host to a one-hour program on Nov. 21. Chief of Security and Law Enforcement Sgt. Maj. Jeffrey Koontz welcomed a living history group and read a National American Indian Heritage Month letter signed by Secretary of the Army John McHugh, Chief of Staff Gen. Raymond T. Odierno and Sgt. Maj. of the Army Raymond F. Chandler III that begins, "We are honored
to recognize the outstanding contributions American Indians have made to our Nation and our Army."

Koontz then introduced key-note speaker Edward Nunez from the group “Journeys to the Past.” He was accompanied by his son Jackson Tahuka, daughter-in-law Morning Dove and grandson Clinton whose tribal name is Turtle. California is home to
more than 100 Tribal Nations and that rich culture is the primary focus of their presentation.

In a key history lesson of the day, Nunez explained the family name his son is now using.

"He (Nunez’s father) had left home at 16, joined the Army and served in the Philippines during WWII. When he got out of the military he found it very difficult to find a job, even though he was a veteran," said Nunez. "He adopted a Spanish surname, Nunes, which he later changed to Nunez."

Whether the name change made the difference or not, Nunez’s father did land a job with Alcoa in Vernon, Calif., where he worked for 45 years. His father didn’t share the name change story with the family until recently. At 90-years old, according to Nunez, he didn’t want his living history to end.

Jackson and many of the younger family members are reverting to the family name, Tahuka. At 65, Nunez, has decided that it would be far too much paperwork to change effectively… including his own military record.

Nunez, a Seminole, is married to Jacque, an Acjachemen of southern California. Jackson performed in hand-made regalia representative of both parents’ heritage. He played the flute and sang a traditional song accompanied by a gourd instrument common to this region. His wife then joined him for a performance of the "Prairie Chicken Dance" which has its origins in the Blackfoot Nation. Jackson described it as a "courting dance" that worked, proudly showing his wedding band.

The Journeys to the Past program enables the Tahuka-Nunez family to share their proud culture, "Just as importantly, we hope it inspires others to discover their own heritage," added Nunez.

(USACE photo by Richard Rivera)

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